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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)
it in a situation like this, jim. i'm happy to report there was not any indication of any calls last night that people were thinking about their own pnl or business model. trying to make a decision that was right for all of the market participants. we ended up doing that. my bias is to keep markets open but this is a pretty easy decision from our point of view in the end. it's not worth putting people in danger. it's no time to be a hero. it's silly. >> what happened where initially there was a take it would open? when we were at goldman in 1985, the issue is there's no internet or real connection. we didn't have these things. we have internet and people who say we don't even need new york city anymore. how about the out of town guys who thought this was a great chance to trump new york? >> again, we got none of that from the other venues that are located outside of manhattan. there was no talk about them staying open. it goes back to what bob said. if a couple of the major markets are closed, i think you're doing everyone else a disservice if just a few thinly traded venues which would ev
that means these folks took the storm seriously and evacuated before sandy hit. abc news producer jim debrill is in breezy point and joins us live on the phone. jim, tell me what's going on out there. >> you know, i'm in a community of 4,200 homes out here. this is a community that lost the most people during 9/11, firefighters and cops, during 9/11. this community was hit horribly tonight. around 6:30, they lost power. then the water came rushing in. and many here expected there would be flooding, there would be loss of power. but then this fire just erupted on one of the walks out here. and went from walk to walk to walk. we were in a home and the fire was literally right across from us. and as this fire just spread, we evacuated not once, we waded our way to another home, and then realized that the parking lot we were next to, the cars literally started to blow up in that parking lot. so we had to leave there, we went to another home. again, the fire continued to spread. my understanding, it has spread across about 12 blocks of breezy point. an area that they call the wedge. it's a place i
voting for qubaltimore.en is an... jim smith: question seven will bring table games like... blackjack and poker to baltimore. stephanie rawlings-blake: you're talking about 500 new jobs. ken ulman: and increased tourism will mean more business... for maryland's small businesses. jim smith: and instead of marylanders spending... five hundred and fifty million in other states... ken ulman: question seven will keep that money right here. stephanie rawlings-blake: more jobs, millions for schools. jim smith: i'm voting for question seven. ken ulman: i'm voting for question seven. stephanie rawlings-blake: and i'm voting for question seven. >>> and welcome back to our special storm coverage. now breaking news out of new jersey. where the oyster creek nuclear power plant declared an alert due to flooding. they were offline due to fueling, not currently generating power. u.s. nuclear regulatory commission said this is the second-lowest of four action levels and they anticipate the water levels will begin to abate over the next few hours. we will of course keep you updated. there are eight nuclear facil
happened i was looking at jim cramer on twitter, immediately you have to sell out. you have to sell out. whatever apple says, you have to sell apple. these two people who are out been promoted, you have to sell apple. the psychology of apple has gone from being this is an up stock to being i have to get out, it's important to recognize that has been a psychological shift on the stock. >> we'll have much more on all these stories later on in the show. meantime, damage assessments continuing all up and down the northeast seaboard. to eric fisher who is in narragansett, rhode island. eric? >> reporter: cnbc says we're just coming -- forget cnbc. weather channel, what's up. >> that's live television for you. >> forget cnbc -- i often thought that was a neglect it tiff attitude. >> meantime, let's head over to lower manhattan by the new york stock exchange with the latest on the hurricane. scott? >> this is cnbc, right? >> yes. >> you're not allowed to say that. >> reporter: things are at least improving in terms of the weather conditions. we have had had had a couple of showers and the wind
boardwalk, ripped apart by the storm, pieces scattered. the mayor put it this way. it's no longer there. jim clancy is live in belmar now. he joins me. give me an update on the conditions there, jim. >> reporter: well, i think i can say the sun has come out, and i want to show you something. even since we arrived at 5:00 this morning, the water has receded, gone down six inches, gone back several people. people have come by to take photos. people in this neighborhood can't wait to see it. talked to a member of the fire department who said it's happening. it's very slow. but we're making some progress here. they're pumping out st. rose's high school gym next to me here. crews moved in, put in some pumps, pushing water out. other businesses, the hum of generators has taken over. you see skip loaders and front loaders heading down the streets in all directions. the fire chiefs, people have been out here, going door to door telling residents we're going to pump out your basements, we're going to get to all of these things. the residents, of course, can't wait. they're still shaking their heads i
of that stature in film. (jim jarmusch) for us in new york at the time, in the late seventies, it was an idea kind of related to the music scene at the time, which was that we are not virtuoso filmmakers, but we have something we'd like to express. and that desire to express it was more important than having a more professional attitude, or having a lot of experience. (jim jarmusch) when i started thinking about "stranger than paradise," there were severe limitations as far as how much money i could get to make a film like that. (jim stark) "stranger than paradise" cash cost was $160,000, and it grossed many times more than that. jim's pacing was very slow and deliberate. there was a kind of irony in how he approached the world, which was not typical of filmmaking. there's a meandering approach that lets you decide what you thought was important about the story. the style of the movie and the sensibility of it were clearly emanated from the personality of jim jarmusch but also happened to be perfect for the financial circumstances and constraints under which he had to work. the idea of using actor
. >> jim, your favorite "star wars" film, please. >> it's definitely "empire strikes back." i'm chind ofkind of a chewie gu. >> who isn't? >> new jersey governor chris christie, new york city mayor michael bloomberg have come out as sort of the faces of this storm. is there a political impact here? it's been interesting, jim, to watch the relationship between chris christie and president obama and the relationship between mayer bloomberg and president obama. explain that a little bit. >> i find that christie to be most fascinating because he's going out there on all the talk shows really praising barack obama and how cooperative he's been with governor christie in new jersey. if you look at it from christ christie's perspective, that's what he should be doing. he's a governor who's going to need as much assistance and help in the aftermath of the storm as anyone. befriending the president, praising the president, bringing the president into his state and traveling the state, that's what you do when you're a governor. >> by the way, jim -- by the way, jim, not being cynical, i think yo
and new jersey. jim axelrod is at battery park in manhattan, which was inundated with water. jim, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie. high tide has come here. at least in this part of battery park, the water is not threatening to come over the wall, which is at least one piece of good news in a city that is facing more than its share of trouble. superstorm sandy made landfall late monday. a wet and windy nightmare. >> we knew that this was going to be a very dangerous storm and the storm has met our expectations. >> reporter: actually, sandy exceeded them. around 9:00 pm the storm produced a record surge at battery park in manhattan, 14.88 feet breaching the sea wall and flooding the area. manhattan's waterfront seemed to disappear as the surge rushed over the wall. >> it's the unknown. it's the storm of the century. >> reporter: roads and cars were quickly covered, ground zero was en engulfed and across the harbor in brooklyn, so much flooding at coney island that emergency responders couldn't reach the area. the corrosive sea water headed undergrou
canceled. abc's jim avila has details from reagan national airport in washington. good morning, jim. >> reporter: good morning. we're pretty much at a ground stop across the eastern seaboard with trains, planes and buses, even cruise ships told to go away. look at this, reagan national, 7:00 on a monday morning, this should be jammed with people. almost totally empty. as we walk across the concourse, the board here is really a wall of cancellations. all the flights canceled here except for a handful are getting out. so it's really quite a mess. and people are being told to stay away from the airports. >> reporter: this morning, much of the nation as a standstill. the per romps superstorm crippling much of america's transportation system. amtrak trains and airports from north carolina to boston virtually shut down. nearly 7,000 flights canceled. most either fly from or through one of the hubs in sandy's path. >> you prepare, prepare, prepare, then they change. >> reporter: all those cancellations are creating a ripple effect. forcing delays as far west as seattle and san francisco. s
sunday night. but look at this morning. the skies much emptier. jim lavila has the details. >> reporter: nearly a total ground stop here. the flights are canceled. almost all across the country, whether it's trains, butss, and also planes, have been canceled this morning. take a look what we have here at reagan national. this airfield, this corridor, completely empty. look at the boards over here, they become cancellation walls at the airports tell people to stay home. >> reporter: this morning, much of the nation as a standstill. the ferocious superstorm crippling much of america's transportation system. amtrak trains and airports from north carolina to boston virtually shut down. nearly 7,000 flights canceled. most either fly from or through one of the hubs in sandy's path. >> you prepare, prepare, prepare, and then they can change. >> reporter: all those cancellations are creating a ripple effect. forcing delays as far west as seattle and san francisco. stranded passengers, for the most part, taking it in stride. >> it's not the airport's fault. you can't really control the weather.
white men. let me play what senator jim webb said to chuck todd on this issue. take a listen. >> how in the name of the lord can the democratic party, the party of andrew jackson, only be getting 28 periods of time of the white male working class vote? from my perspective it's because of the interest group politics in the democratic party, that particular cultural group doesn't believe the democrats like that. >> are some white voters turned off by the democratic party? if so, where does the popular clinton factor come in? >> the president is there and will be in ohio for a reason. the president can bring into focus the idea that with the right economic policies and if you stick with it, as we did in 1995 and 1996, prosperity comes along. the real key numbers in ohio are look at the unemployment rate when the president came into office and where it is now. it's down i think nearly 50%. the auto bailout, some of the president's investments in manufacturing have really paid off in ohio, frankly, at the end of the day we can talk back and forth about different demographics. the presiden
al. >>> welcome to "squawk on the street." >> we go straight to jim cramer with details. >> malawi is not going to retire. the board has said, we are committed to down lolly to at least 24.14. i don't think he's going anywhere. he's going to be promoted to chief operating officer. they have to rationalize europe, rationalize asia obviously and i think this is big news because i think a lot of people felt that allen had finished job one. >> i think that the key here is promoting the mark field, he or she is saying on the concern is that the likely successor would leave and find another success. it's important also to shareholders to -- >> this is one of those where obviously mark had a tremendous reputation with what he's done in north america. the man, he's now going to be in charge of lincoln. they're talking about a tremendous decline. they're talking about this cold war between japan and china. gm had a good quarter too. gm is behind them in terms of this raushlization. obviously europe is just a disastrous report. latin america pretty good, asia had a swing. the most important
-to-date. >> dr. jim hammond from baldwin animal hospital is here with cindy. she is still in in the halloween spirit. >> she is a direct descendant of pt. she is a very sweet dog. we actually had some little rascal pets from baltimore. >> here is a halloween question. my cats got into the leftover halloween candy but they seemed fine. does chocolate pose any risk to catch? >> yes and no. it depends on the kind of chocolate and the amount. the best thing to do is air on the side of being saved. if your cat. -- err on the side of being safe. if your packets into chocolate, called the clinic. >> i rescued a kitten and wonder who is responsible for initial health care. >> financial help is available, but there are a lot of people who need financial help. call your veterinarian. there are groups that can help. there are ways to get rabies shots in expansively, there are ways to get your animals fayed and neutered. call your local veterinarian. ayed and new turd. call your local veterinarian. >> any way to get rid of freeze the apparent -- fleas that really works? >> it depends upon whether it is a
evacuated. jim axelrod has more from lower manhattan. >> reporter: good morning. new yorkers pride themselves on being intrepid. and right now we still have some people walking along the wall here in lower manhattan. in a couple of hours if they're here, we'll have to look for another adjective other than intrepid. the big worry here is that the surge of water could be as high as 11, 12 feet. that would get over the wall, into the subway systems and electrical systems, and that's what the big catastrophic worry is here in lower manhattan. the transit system shut down schools shut down. 375,000 people from the lowest lying areas in new york have been evacuated as the biggest city braces for the impacts of hurricane sandy. charlie? >> thank you. >> thank you. >>> meteorologist from cbs 4 has been watching sandy closely. jeff, this is getting scary based on reports you're pulling in. it sounds like this is getting worse. >> good morning, nor amp good morning, everyone. yeah. this storm is getting a little bit worse in the atlantic now. you see that the core of th
the storm. buses are running and roads are reopening but the subways are still closed. jim axelrod is in lower manhattan. jim, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. the sea water that came over that wall and flowed into the underground power stations and subway stations has crippled lower manhattan. and new york city transit officials say this is the biggest disaster to ever hit the transit system. superstorm sandy may have moved on but parts of new york city remain paralyzed in her wake. >> restoring power and mass transit remain the two biggest challenges in the days ahead. that recovery is a mammoth job. >> it's the worst thing that happened to this city certainly since 9/11. >> reporter: new york city subway system which averages more than 5 million commuters per work day is closed indefinitely because all seven subway tunnels linking manhattan to brooklyn and queens are flooded. at some stations near battery park where monday's surge of sea water hit hardest stairwells looked more like swimming pools. >> there was no way to prepare that would have kept the water out. >> rep
very much. >>> for more on those awfully long lines and short fuses, the weather channel's jim cantore is at a gas station in ridgefield, new jersey, just west of manhattan. hi, jim. >> reporter: hey, how you doing? this is actually coordinated pretty well. it's just a nice little thing we got going on here off of the turnpike. you can see these cars are waiting in line. what's happening, there is an officer right here pretty much telling everyone which lane to get in. and then they're coming from really the exit. this is about a half-mile long just up in here. you can see them kind of getting in line here. the wait is about an hour and a half. that's about how long people are waiting. unfortunately, we aren't allowed to walk up to them and talk to them in the cars. sunoco has asked us not to do that so we are respecting that so we can keep the live shot out through here. but guys, the scope of this problem is like this. you've got 50% of the gas stations in this area without power. that's the first thing. check them off. another 20% of them are now running out of gas. all right? check
it more difficult, houses that are so close together. in fact, abc news' jim dubreuil was on the scene overnight and here's how he described the scene. >> reporter: this is a community that lost the most people during 9/11, firefighters and cops during 9/11. this community was hit horribly tonight. then the fire just erupted. we were in a home and fire was literally right across from us. and as the fire just spread, we waded our way it another home and realized that the parking lot that we were next to, the cars literally started to blow up. again, the fire continued to spread. my understanding it has spread across about 12 blocks of breezy point. an area they call "the wedge." we thought we would come here and see people wanting to leave. tonight, they're being forced to leave not by flood, not by sandy, but by fire. >> we will be having information as it becomes available from queens. we'll have it for you again. a look at the greater new york city area struck so hard. including amy out there in staten island. >> josh, we have dramatic scenes of devastation coming into us right now.
's also back in full campaign mode. he's not pulling any punches. his new line of attack, jim acosta will have that next. dad vo: ok, time for bed, kiddo. lights out. ♪ (sirens) (train horn) ♪ vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> mitt romney is himself back in full campaign mode today in virginia. here's cnn's national political correspondent jim acosta. >> reporter: wolf, the truce is over. after dialing back his criticism of president obama in the immediate aftermath of superstorm sandy, mitt romney has shifted back into campaign mode. and the gop candidate has unleashed some new eye opening lines of attack. mitt romney turned battleground virginia into a battlefield ending a two-daybreak from the campaign's fireworks with some new verbal cannon shots aimed at winning the last five days of the race. >> i know that the obama folks are chanting four more years, four more years. but our chant is this. five more days. five more days is our chant. >> reporter: romney then mocked president obama for saying he m
website, c-span.org. jim is in orlando, florida. he's on our line for independents. jim, you're optimistic about the economy. why is that? caller: i'm optimistic after the election. i think that a lot of companies have been holding out hiring this year. i think it all comes back to the money. and when i say the money, a lot of the billionaires, when they see that their taxes are going from 14% to 36%, they're going to do whatever they can to make sure that the president looks bad as far as this year. when you look historically, the first quarter of the year is usually slow. we had a good first quarter. in the second two quarters, jobs have been anemic. i think the last two or three years, we slowly climbed out of this mess, and it will take, as clinton said, another four years to get out of it. but i do see some positives. host: jim, do you really think that business owners are going to risk profits and losses based on trying to make the president look bad? caller: i don't think business owners are. i think that big corporations that have billionaire stockholders -- if my taxes were going
-- >> jim clancy is also with cnn. jim is in that area right now. jim, is there a sense that the danger has passed? >> reporter: there's a sense that they faced down the destruction that has been caused. they've now seen those images that you showed, you saw the faces of those evacuees, what they've been through. there are still dangers looming out there, a long way to go. the gas lines you were talking about are still a challenge in some areas. some residents challenging why they haven't been cut off much earlier. and there's hopes that that can be done today. not as easy as it sounds. gaining access to where they can cut off these lines still will leave some of those lines pressurized. there's still a potential threat there. of course, before they can reenergize any of the electric lines in some of these communities, they have to ensure that job is done, carol. otherwise, it could ignite new fires. there's one of the major risks that remains. there are still some people that are holding out, some elderly with their pets, but they're about to give it up. there's no electricity. there's no
by the time jim crow laws were abolished, giving her the chance to do what she did today. >> she was already set in her ways and really wasn't thinking about politics. >> reporter: now rosie is not secretive about who she supports. >> i love obama. >> reporter: you love obama? >> i love obama. >> reporter: rosie requested her ballot in the mail, and her friend turned it in. >> miss rosie should be an inspiration to all of our young people and old. >> reporter: in ft. myers, chad oliver. >> how do you not love that story. >> isn't that something? if she can rock the vote, i think we can all get out and vote. >> there is no excuse. i don't care who you're supporting, no matter what age, where you're at, the storm, whatever. get out there and be heard. if she can do it at 99 years old >> that's right. we can all do it. >> hey, still strong in mind, still strong in spirit. a lot to be said about that. we salute you, man, that's for sure and that is the news for this half hour of the show. remember to follow us on facebook at wnnfans.com. >> and on twitter @abcwnn. use the hash tag #wnnfans. more
. but service is limited and the city faces another day of serious transportation trouble. jim axelrod is at the tip of lower manhattan outside the staten island ferry terminal. good morning, jim. >> reporter: good morning. big step for new yorkers and a psychological boost, to at least have partial subway service restored and to ease some congestion on the roads. there won't be any subway trains coming in and out of here. not today, not tomorrow. not for a while, it would seem. three days after superstorm sandy swept through new york, the city's road to recovery is literally gridlocked. >> traffic is terrible, man. takes 45 minutes just for four block blocks. it's horrible. >> reporter: commuters turned manhattan streets into parking lots. a telling sign of just how badly the city needs its mass transit system back. >> i am declaring a transportation emergency. >> reporter: this morning 14 out of 23 subway lines will begin operating. but none will be able to run below 34th street in manhattan and into brooklyn. multiple tunnels and stations in that area remain flooded with sea water.
' jim debrill was on the scene of the fire in queens. this is what he described. >> reporter: this is a community that lost the most people during 9/11. the firefighters and cons during 9/11. this area was hit horribly tonight. many expected there would be flooding. and then, the fire just erupted. we were in a home and fire was right across from us. as this fire just spread, we waited our way to another home. and then, realized, a parking lot we were next to, the cars started to blow up. and the fire continued to spread. my understanding, it has spread across about 12 blocks of breezy point, an area they call the wedge. we thought we would come here and see people that didn't want to leave. now, they're being forced to leave. not by water. not by flood. not by sandy. but by fire. >> devastation in queens. you see the areas affected in greater new york. we want to go back to staten island. >> that's right. we have more dramatic scenes of devastation coming in right now. extraordinary pictures of a large tanker ship washed up on the shores of staten island. this is a live look
wild out here right now. >> the weather channel's jim cantore with her in new york city. >> will this storm live up to the hype? >> we're going to fd out. this is a factor of the storm beingo big and pushing the wawater up into areas where it can't get out. we saw this with katrina. if the w water comes up as expected, we would be under water, our crew would be under water, the battery park area will be under water. >> donald trump phoning in to me he's staying put in the big apple. >> what -- where are you right now? >>>> i'm in trump tower in my office. >> shouldn't yoube gettiting out of there? >> only because i love new york. we are fully prepared. we know exactly what to do and how to do it. >> you're staying? >> i live or die with it. i built many great ghlings new york and i feel confidence in those buildings because i built them. >> sandy truly a history maker. the stock market's first weather-related shutdown in 27 years. ubway service canceled, grand central station transformed into a ghost town. knbc's chris coleman with mario at the grove. >> what makes this
zone. abc's jim avila shows us some of the surpring ways natural gas could blow. >>> that brings us to the fire ravaged community in the new york city borough of queens. for the first time yesterday, residents were able to viz sit their burned out homes. 111 burned in the firestorm. all the rez,000 dnts who lost everything, all they could do was go poke around in the ashes hoping just to find something. for some it was simply too much. >> i can't believe -- just two months ago we were down here. it's crazy. >> new york governor andrew cuomo toured the fire zone yesterday and promised residents that their community will be rebuilt. >>> and, i -- i keep coming back to the story. of all the scenes we have seen. countless scenes to kind of, it breaks your heart. that scene, in breezy point really its heartbreaking. not just your home, but your friend and neighbors for years. and even itch you survived it, you, you are in the midst of this scene. >> destruction. think that's what we saw in the ninth ward. katrina. certain people lost their homes. but those who still had homes, all they h
. >> for more on where it is going and what's left we are joined by accuweather's jim dickey. good morning, jim. >> good morning, rob and paula. well, the worst looks like it is over here. sandy will slowly weaken as we head forward. a look at radar imagery, the northeast and mid-atlantic. >> okay. technical difficulty there. we apologize for that too. the question we were talking about earlier, the brunt of the storm is over. at issue, back surge, we are talking about, of course, high tide, as well, in a few hours this morning. >> i was talking with our meteorologist ginger zee. i said is it over? what more can we expect? she says there will be a back surge. with the back surge, you might expect higher wind. we don't know to anticipate more flooding, probably going to come when the sunrises. when the sun rises that's when we'll see the aftermath of the extent of the storm. sam champion our weather editor said, quote, this is the scenario everyone feared when making disaster plans. >> that's why, nickname it the perfect storms. so many dangerous factors collided and now we are seeing the afterm
jersey. jim, tourism is huge for folks where you are. how will people move forward? tell me what it looks like today. >> reporter: well, you know, the way that this community of belmar is going to move forward, it is a small community. about 6,000 people year around. 60,000 in the summertime. perhaps even more on the weekends. the only way that these people can move forward or the business community can move forward, tourism can move forward is to get the water out of here, brooke. you know, you look at this stream and say the waters will rece recede. no, they won't. the town is something of a bowl. there are two lakes, two natural lakes. they have to pump that water out. before we get off that shot, brooke, you will be interested to know, bruce springsteen used to go jogging down this street where you see the water. >> where we see the kayaker. >> reporter: down to the beach every morning. yeah. we have met the kayaker and seen him at work today. but i can tell you right now out on the beach, they're really at work and what they're trying to do is pump two inland lakes they have in this
long sinus and headache relief. >>> the search for victims goes on. cnn's jim clancy is searching with u.s. national guard troops. >> reporter: a sometimes forceful systematic search for survivors. >> every time we clear the street -- >> reporter: dozens of members of the u.s. army and air force national guard joined members of the ocean county's prosecutor office to probe seemingly abandoned homes on long beach island's community. in distressed situation they forcibly opened homes to call out for survivors. the prosecutors are on hand because they have jurisdiction if any bodies are uncovered. but in most cases it was a straightforward call to ask if anyone was inside. >> national guard. this part of the mission is search and rescue. pretty much nobody has been here. so we've been trying to see if any residents that have stayed over during the hurricane survived. that's basically what we're looking for here, any survivors. >> reporter: homes already ripped open by superstorm sandy were searched inside and out while these guard teams from new jersey kept a sharp look out for signs
's impact on the race and the economy with chuck todd and cnbc's jim cramer just ahead. >> a quick note for you. we're sad to say that due to sandy we will not be having our halloween celebration on the plaza tomorrow, so if you were planning to join us out here in costume, we want you to stay home, stay safe. we will get that done at some other point. things are more important. >> they are indeed. you'll have to put the ponte hose away for another year. get the latest on the storm, the record flooding we've seen in lower manhattan. let's get to natalie morales in battery park city in the southern tip of mat hannan. natalie, good morning to you again. >> reporter: good morning to you, savannah, once again. we're fully now beginning to realize the devastation of sandy. as you have mentioned in the reporting, at least 16 deaths total being blamed on this storm. downtown here in lower manhattan, can you see the waters have receded. at the height of the storm though here in battery park there was a storm surge of 13 feet. that is a record-breaker here in new york city. at least 6 million pe
's unheard of. jim cantore, he said this was the coldest hurricane he's ever covered in his entire life. it doesn't make sense. such a strange event. the storm sizewise was like the second biggest storm we've ever kept track of going up the coast including famous blizzards and hurricane. this storm was immense. the stronger the winds, the larger the wind field and the more water these storms throw on shore and that's why we have such problems. we haven't seen the worst of the pictures yet from the jersey shore. when chris christie said i think we'll be shocked when we see them tomorrow. there may be cases where the ocean met the bay. in other words, it just eroded right through the barrier islands and i think we're going to see some of that tomorrow. >> what will happen to terms tomorrow and this those snow areas. what can they expect from temperature tools? >> excellent point. usually you lose power and it's usy summertime and don't y. temperatures in the 50s and 60s during the day and at night, 40s and 50s. if you're trying to keep your family warm and you have no power, that's a whol
the charts in name recognition. she raised $18 million more than her democratic opponent jim graves. her district has an 8% republican registration edge but still she only leads graves by 6 points. florida congressman allen west, he's raised $17 million compared to the $3.5 million of his democratic opponent patrick murphy. but polls show murphy leading west 48% to 47%. and, of course, we just cannot forget illinois congressman joe walsh -- perhaps the craziest of them all. he's answering a question about women's reproductive rights. take a listen. >> if a woman's life is at issue, would you say she was allowed to have a abortion? >> let me say there's no sun exception. with modern technology and science, you can't find one instance. this is an issue that opponents of life throw out there to make us look unreasonable. >> jennifer: actually, congressman, i think you're doing a pretty good job of looking unreasonable on your own. fortunately, voters in walsh's district agree because the latest polls have him trailin
to jim gallagher, the fire chief in linden hur en lindenhurst, new york. jim gallagher, explain what it looks like where you are because i've seen a heck of a lot of watter and a house fire. yes? >> yes. basically, part of our water area is flooded in. we have 2 or 3 feet of water there. earlier this morning we had a house fire that we had to fight, about 2 or 3 feet of water we had to go into to get to this house. >> can you tell me how the house caught fire? >> we didn't really investigate that part right now. my guess is probably the electrical, because it was underneath the water and the electrical probably shorted out. >> how much of this do you anticipate over the next couple days certainly with all this water, issues with utility, issues with electricity? is this just the beginning of a long couple of days, sir? >> yes. it's going to be a long couple days with this. definitely we're having power outages in -- minor pounl minor outages right now, but as the storm gets bigger there will be more, especially through the night. >> jim gallagher, we'll be touch with you. i know wate
. it's not open today at all. it's at a standstill. jim avila is in washington, reagan national airport. it's one of the airports that are trying to get back to normal. good morning, jim. >> reporter: good morning, george. look behind me. the planes are back. the smell of the jet fuel is here. the roar of the engines, back. all along the east coast, the airlines saying today is reboot day. the major exception, however, as you point out, laguardia airport. let's look at the pictures. laguardia from the air. you're seeing there's all kinds of problems there. it's right on the long island sound. it was overrun by the tidal waters. the runways and gates flooded. jfk, the other major airport in new york, is running. and some of the planes began to land there. but for laguardia, it will still be a few days away. the faa has to inspect the runways before they can reopen. that's the situation on the east coast for the airports, george. >> jim, thanks. >>> let's get back to josh, now, with the morning's other top stories. >> we're going to begin with the presidential race, now less than a week a
"sopranos" jim van zandt is a true son of -- we'll hear what he has to say about the devastation of sandy. that's coming up next in the next hour of "newsroom." you see us bank on busier highways. on once empty fields. everyday you see all the ways all of us at us bank are helping grow our economy. lending more so companies and communities can expand, grow stronger and get back to work. everyday you see all of us serving you, around the country, around the corner. us bank. >>> jerry sandusky may be sitting in a prison cell, but the penn state child sex abuse case far from over. new today, former penn state university president graham, formerly charged now with perjury, obstruction of justice, conspiracy and endangering the welfare of children. he joins the former athletic director and the former vice president of business and finance at the university all facing those same charges. >>> in new york they have been performing without an audience for days. now the stars of late night comedy, they're back reacting to the storm. going to hear what new jersey native john stewart thinks about the
to evacuate, there were some who chose to stick it out. from long beach island, new jersey, hey jim, good morning. >> good morning to you, soledad. an icy wind is cutting across this largely abandoned island. the only people who are here are construction workers, emergency crews, and the national guard, as well as police. residents have mostly abandoned the island. there are a few, a few holed up who refuse to leave, including a 93-year-old woman, we are told. but there's no gas on this island. there's no electricity on this island. we came here in the cold, darkness, and there wasn't a light to be seen almost anywhere except the emergency headquarters that's been set up for the people who are trying to put this island back together again. 18 miles long. some 18,000 homes. and all of them, all the owners, waiting to see how much damage they sustain. a lot of wind damage, some water damage, of course, but not the heavy kind of damage we've seen in some of the other areas here along the jersey shore. at the same time the residents who want to get out here have been told that it will be a ma
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